Languages & Humanities

Languages and Humanities includes English (Reading, Writing and SPaG (Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar), Speaking and Listening, History, R.E. (Religious Education) and Geography.

In Reception the children follow the Early Learning Goals (2013) for reading and writing.

Children in Year 1 and Year 2 are following the new (2014) National Curriculum, which we use at Little Gonerby as the basis for our broad, balanced and project-based curriculum.

 

Reading

 

Reading skills should be taught when linked to projects where possible to ensure real world application.


Key reading Skills include:
Decoding
Infering and deducing
Comparing
Evaluating

 

Reading end of Foundation stage (Reception) expectations

Expected standard:

Children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate an understanding when talking with others about what they have read.

 

Exceeding standard:

Children can read phonically regular words of more than one syllable as well as many irregular but high frequency words. They use phonic, semantic and syntactic knowledge to understand unfamiliar vocabulary. They can describe the main events in the simple stories they have read.

 

Reading end of Year One expectations

 

Towards national standards:

  • I can read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the common graphemes for all 40+ phonemes.

  • I can read accurately some words of two or more syllables that contain the same grapheme-phoneme correspondence.

  • I can read many common exception words.

  • I can read aloud many words quickly and accurately without overt sounding and blending.

  • I can sound many unfamiliar words accurately

In discussion with the teacher:

  • I can answer questions and make inferences on the basis of what is being said and done in a familiar book that is read to them.

Reading end of Year Two expectations

 

Towards national standards:

I can read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the common graphemes for all 40+ phonemes.

I can read accurately some words of two or more syllables that contain the same grapheme-phoneme correspondence.

I can read many common exception words.

I can read aloud many words quickly and accurately without overt sounding and blending.

I can sound many unfamiliar words accurately

In a familiar book:

In age appropriate books:

 

And working at expected standards:

In discussion with the teacher:

 

  • I can check it makes sense to me.

  • I can answer questions and make some inferences on the basis of what is being said and done.

  • I can read words accurately and fluently without overt sounding and blending.

  • I can sound out most unfamiliar words accurately without undue hesitation.

  • I can read accurately most words of two syllables or more.

  • I can read most words containing common suffixes.

  • I can read most common exception words.

  • I can answer questions and make inferences on the basis of what is being said and done in a familiar book that is read to them.

Writing

Key writing skills include:

Spelling

Handwriting

Composing

Spelling

Vocabulary

Grammar

Punctuation

 

Writing end of Foundation (reception) stage expectations.

Expected

Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They write sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.

 

Exceeding

Children can spell phonically regular words of more than one syllable as well as many irregular but high frequency words. They use key features of narrative in their own writing.

 

Writing end of Year One expectations.

Towards national standards:

 

  • I can demarcate some sentences with a capital letter and full stop.

  • I can segment spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes spelling some correctly.

  • I can spell some common exception words.

  • I can form lower case letters starting in the correct place and of the correct size.

Writing end of Year Two expectations

Towards national standards:

I can demarcate some sentences with a capital letter and full stop.

I can segment spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes spelling some correctly.

I can spell some common exception words.

I can form lower case letters starting in the correct place and of the correct size.

 

And working at the expected standards:

 

  • I can demarcate most sentences with capital letters and full stops and with some use of question marks and exclamation marks.

  • I can use sentences with different forms in my writing ( statements, questions, exclamations and commands).

  • I can use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify.

  • I can use past and present tense mostly correctly and consistently.

  • I can use coordination (or/and/but) and some subordination (when/if/that/because).

  • I can segment spoken words into phonemes and represent them correctly.

  • I can spell many common exception words.

  • I can spell words with contracted forms.

  • I can add suffixes to spell some words correctly in my writing e.g. -ment, -ness, -less, ly

  • I can use diagonal and horizontal strokes to join letters in some of my writing.

  • I can write capital letters and digits correctly.

  • I can use spaces between words.
Writing below shows the progression from reception to year 2. Click to enlarge
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3

Handwriting

 

At Little Gonerby we use cursive handwriting.  This style of writing includes a 'whoosh' - a 'ski slope' at the beginning of each letter, and a 'flick' at then end, which enables letters to be joined with more ease.

 

                          Image result for cursive alphabet

Cursive Handwriting: How to Write the Alphabet

This is a cursive writing demonstration video showing how to write the letters of the alphabet. It models how to write the letters of the alphabet using cursive script. Cursive handwriting is commonly taught in schools across the world.

Phonics

 

At Little Gonerby Infant School we take the view that for pupils to become literate, the elements of English – reading, writing and speaking and listening – must be taught and practised both discretely and together.  Skills, especially those that focus on reading and writing non-fiction/fiction texts, are linked and applied in other subjects across the whole of the National Curriculum.

 

The main teaching for reading and writing is done through synthetic phonics and we follow the goverments recommended 'letters and sounds' program. Phonics is taught every day in a variety of ways across the school.

 

Below is an explanation to the 6 phonic phases.

 

                                           

 

What is Letters and Sounds?

 

Letters and Sounds is a phonics resource published by the Department for Education and Skills in 2007. It aims to build children's speaking and listening skills in their own right as well as to prepare children for learning to read by developing their phonic knowledge and skills. It sets out a detailed and systematic programme for teaching phonic skills for children starting by the age of five, with the aim of them becoming fluent readers by age seven.

 

 

Phase

Phonic Knowledge and Skills

Phase One

 (Nursery/Reception)

Activities are divided into seven aspects, including environmental sounds, instrumental sounds, body sounds, rhythm and rhyme, alliteration, voice sounds and finally oral blending and segmenting.

Phase Two

(Reception) up to 6 weeks

Learning 19 letters of the alphabet and one sound for each. Blending sounds together to make words. Segmenting words into their separate sounds. Beginning to read simple captions.

Phase Three

(Reception) up to 12 weeks

The remaining 7 letters of the alphabet, one sound for each. Graphemes such as ch, oo, th representing the remaining phonemes not covered by single letters. Reading captions, sentences and questions. On completion of this phase, children will have learnt the "simple code", i.e. one grapheme for each phoneme in the English language.

Phase Four

(Reception) 4 to 6 weeks

No new grapheme-phoneme correspondences are taught in this phase. Children learn to blend and segment longer words with adjacent consonants, e.g. swim, clap, jump.

Phase Five

(Throughout Year 1)

Now we move on to the "complex code". Children learn more graphemes for the phonemes which they already know, plus different ways of pronouncing the graphemes they already know.

Phase Six

(Throughout Year 2 and beyond)

Working on spelling, including prefixes and suffixes, doubling and dropping letters etc.

 

 

 

SPaG-spelling, punctuation and grammar.

 

Click on link below to see SPaG objectives and progression. When possible SPaG is taught through projects. It is also taught in guided writing and phonics.

 

 

Religious Education (R.E.)

 

As a Church of England Aided School, Religious Education (R.E.) is viewed as an important part of the curriculum. It contributes to the ethos and values of the school and supports the school’s aims. We follow the Lincolnshire Agreed Syllabus.

 

We aim to ensure that the children:

  • gain a sound knowledge of the Christian faith based on the teachings of the Bible, particularly those of the New Testament.
  • develop a sense of wonder, awe, curiosity and mystery,
  • learn to ask and provide answers to BIG questions which are puzzling and difficult to answer or where not everyone agrees on the answer,
  • develop a sense of respect, sensitivity and cultural awareness and to develop a respect for the rights of other people to hold views and beliefs that are different from their own. This includes developing an awareness of other faiths.

 

We also aim to:

  • instill a sense of self worth and sustain children's self esteem.
  • provide children with opportunities for spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.
  • encourage children to make informed decisions and to accept responsibility for the consequences of their choices.
  • enable children to explore our shared human experience and the questions of meaning and purpose which arise from our shared experiences.
  • develop the ability of pupils to think about, and develop for themselves, beliefs and values by which they can live, through studying concepts like celebration, the sacred, authority, religious belief and lifestyle and through exploring the fundamental questions of life.

 

Children are taught R.E. by their class teacher as part of the wider school curriculum. Where appropriate, R.E. is integrated into other areas of the curriculum in a cross-curricular approach and linked with our school values of respect, fairness, honesty, working together, caring and doing our best. For instance R.E. may be taught and explored through art, drama, music, story and discussion.

 

Activities are planned to encourage participation by all children at a level appropriate to their ability.

 

A range of artefacts, pictures, photos, posters, videos, visits and visitors will be used to support the children’s learning. We have strong links with St Wulfram’s Church and children regularly visit the church as part of their RE studies e.g. when exploring baptism or places of worship. The clergy and other members of the community at St Wulfram’s are willing to meet with the children and be involved with Religious Education. Year 2 children also take part in the Church Schools Infant Festival held at Lincoln Cathedral each year.

Geography 

 

Children study places, beginning with those around the school and later moving further afield to make comparisons in order to acquire geographical vocabulary and to develop skills of geographical enquiry. The environment is studied, as are the jobs people do locally and the children’s responses to the local area. Visits, both local and further afield, and visitors are a valuable resource in the teaching of geography.

 

History 

 

Children are taught about the differences between past and present times and enabled to develop a sense of chronology. Skills of research and consideration of different kinds of evidence about the past are introduced. Where possible, study of the past is related to events, places and artefacts familiar to the children today, and use is made of visits, visitors and the school and local area.